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Digital Darwinism

Darwinism of Business Strategy

Digital Darwinism

Your customers are changing. Your customers want more, they want different, they want new, the want fully-loaded, and the want minimalism. How will you adapt?

It’s easy to stay with the status quo. A wise person doesn’t rock the boat, the old adage goes. But that’s assuming the sea is calm of course. What if the sea has transformed into a turbulent hurricane and the only way to stay afloat is to rock the boat and embrace the waves?

Business isn’t getting less turbulent, you may think your organization is immune but when it comes time for layoffs, a horrible “I told you so” is going to be the last thing you remember from your obsolete job.

It’s survival of the fittest on a whole new level.

The only constant is change. You must adapt. You must cannibalize your own products. Steve Jobs said this. His rationale was that if you don’t cannibalize your own products your competitors will.

Your core ‘why’ may never change but you’re probably going to change everything else about your product/service offering. Why wait till the market forces you to change? Why not lead change?

Plan to innovate. Plan to get feedback on your innovation. Plan to measure what works and be willing to change the plan based on the feedback you receive.

The organizations that thrive in 2013 and beyond will have a determination to adapt. A willingness to change for the better. They will take calculated risks and understand that the riskiest place to be is standing still avoiding change.

(Photo Credit: Digital Darwinism: survival of the business)

Brain

You Learn, You Live. (If you’re learning fast enough)

You live, you learn. You learn, you live.
The old adage, often used in hindsight, has now been replaced, especially in terms of business, with a new situational appraisal.  Learning is absolutely necessary for survival.

In Eric Reis’s New York Times Bestseller ‘The Lean Startup’, Reis emphasizes that (in business) “The only way to win is to learn faster than everyone else.

This can (and needs to be) applied to a business’s marketing.  Too many times, companies forge ahead with marketing plans strictly based on the mediums available and inflate their advertising budgets to execute their “strategy”.  There are (at least) three things that need to be thoroughly investigated before making any decisions. They are emphasized here:

1. YOU
Learn who you are.
Ask yourself important/hard questions
And then:

Don’t assume people will love you.

Don’t incessantly bleed brand info.

Create context, provide value, b.o.b. (bend over backwards)

2. YOUR CUSTOMERS
Learn who your customers are.
Find out who they are, where they are, and what you can do to get them to do what you want them to.
And then:

Don’t assume people will love you.

Don’t incessantly bleed brand info.

Create context, provide value, b.o.b. (bend over backwards)

3. PLATFORMS
Learn the platforms needed to connect.
Get some dirt under your fingernails. Try. Fail. But don’t waste time.
And then:

Don’t assume people will love you.

Don’t incessantly bleed brand info.

Create context, provide value, b.o.b. (bend over backwards)

In conclusion:
Don’t simply spend on advertising to create an image for your business. Spend on the human capital and processes that will make your customer’s one-on-one experience remarkable. The effect will be noteworthy and spread exponentially. Your advertising will be real.