management-entitlement-the-actual-problem-at-your-company

Management Entitlement: The Actual Problem At Your Company

Almost everyone I talk to these days who’s over the age of 50 always complains about the The Entitled Managerentitlement of young employees. Some have even gone to say that being “entitled” is the worst characteristic in a young budding employee. I’m not arguing this point, I think it’s valid. What I am seeing more and more of though is management entitlement.

You know these managers. They expect employees to work harder than they do because they’ve been around since the great depression and have more management experience that Drucker himself. The owner who thinks they can run their company in an autocratic style, fast-forward a couple years and this chap can’t figure out why none of his employees have ever invited him out for a pint and turnover is thru the roof.

You can lie to employees for a while and still make money as a business. But sooner or later the market will find out, it always does. Information travels too quickly.

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11 Facts You Need To Know About Your Brain

Brain RulesThis blog post is based on John Medina’s book Brain Rules: 12 Principles for Surviving and Thriving at Work, Home, and School. I loved this book, it’s a thought-provoking read. It teaches you about your brain in a way that’s actionable and easily remembered. At the end of every chapter he sums up what the important parts of the chapter were. Kind of like a coles notes of his own book. Atta boy John, good on you.

1. Exercise helps you think better.

 

Brain Rules Quotes - Alzheimer prevention

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The Marketing Revolution: What You Need To Know About an Interconnected World

This is a presentation I did for Farm Credit Canada’s marketing group in Regina this Septemeber.  If you weren’t there the slides may be confusing as I like using as many pictures as I can.  If you have questions on it please don’t hesitate to Tweet me (@jephmaystruck) or e-mail me at jephmaystruck(at)gmail(dot)com.

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You Learn, You Live. (If you’re learning fast enough)

You live, you learn. You learn, you live.
The old adage, often used in hindsight, has now been replaced, especially in terms of business, with a new situational appraisal.  Learning is absolutely necessary for survival.

In Eric Reis’s New York Times Bestseller ‘The Lean Startup’, Reis emphasizes that (in business) “The only way to win is to learn faster than everyone else.

This can (and needs to be) applied to a business’s marketing.  Too many times, companies forge ahead with marketing plans strictly based on the mediums available and inflate their advertising budgets to execute their “strategy”.  There are (at least) three things that need to be thoroughly investigated before making any decisions. They are emphasized here:

1. YOU
Learn who you are.
Ask yourself important/hard questions
And then:

Don’t assume people will love you.

Don’t incessantly bleed brand info.

Create context, provide value, b.o.b. (bend over backwards)

2. YOUR CUSTOMERS
Learn who your customers are.
Find out who they are, where they are, and what you can do to get them to do what you want them to.
And then:

Don’t assume people will love you.

Don’t incessantly bleed brand info.

Create context, provide value, b.o.b. (bend over backwards)

3. PLATFORMS
Learn the platforms needed to connect.
Get some dirt under your fingernails. Try. Fail. But don’t waste time.
And then:

Don’t assume people will love you.

Don’t incessantly bleed brand info.

Create context, provide value, b.o.b. (bend over backwards)

In conclusion:
Don’t simply spend on advertising to create an image for your business. Spend on the human capital and processes that will make your customer’s one-on-one experience remarkable. The effect will be noteworthy and spread exponentially. Your advertising will be real.

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