What I Learned at The Honest Conference

Last week Strategy Lab partnered with our good buddies at Pidgeon Social to present the first ever Honest Conference. The idea for the conference was simple: Get some amazing marketing leaders in our community together to have a frank and honest discussion about they know and even what they don’t. I wasn’t personally involved in a lot of the planning, so I don’t feel too bad about tooting the team’s horn when I say it was absolutely amazing. The lineup of speakers was the best I’ve ever experienced and the amount of value they offered was unreal. there’s no way I could even begin to cover each speaker’s background and presentation (head to honestconference.com for more info on that), but I felt it was important to jot down some of the big ideas from the day:

Create First and Improve Over Time

One of the big common threads that tied together all of the presentations was the idea that doing something is always better than doing nothing. If you have an idea idea for something you can create (be it a vlog, an Instagram, or a jewelry company), just do it, even (or especially) if it’s not perfect. Over time, you’ll figure it out and get better, but the first step is just to try. As human beings we have an unlimited capacity for talking ourselves out of things that have virtually no downside. Changing that is one of the first big steps towards doing something amazing.

Always Ask for Feedback and Act on It (in Moderation)

This feeds nicely into the idea of feedback which just about very speakers touched on at some point as well. As marketers, business owners, and people, we’re always wondering what we should actually be doing to succeed, when in reality the answer is very clearly right in front of us in the form of feedback from our people and our customers. Asking these people what we can do to improve our product, customer service, or marketing tactics gives us the road map to success. Now, this piece of advice comes with a caveat as not all feedback is helpful when you’re trying to innovate. As Henry Ford once said, “If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses.”

(Photo credit: Sprout Catering!)

If You’re Uncomfortable, You’re Probably Doing Something Right

This is another idea that seemed to emerge somewhere along the way in each presentation. Hillberk and Berk COO Mary Weimer got some laughs from the crowd when she revealed that she is in a perpetual state of discomfort, and never really knows for certain the right thing to do. The truth is, comfort is the cost of doing something that will never really move the needle. Justin Reves’ “80% and Go” rule of thumb I think sums this up perfectly: Get to the point where you’re 80% sure of something and then just go for it  (as Richard Branson would say, “Screw it, let’s do it!”)

Always Keep it Human

Whether it was HB&B’s policy of giving their employees sparkle balls to give out to strangers, or Wheelhouse’s “Wheel Mile” of encouragement at the Queen City Marathon, the stories that really resonated with people at HonCon were those that demonstrated honest to gosh humanity and compassion. In other words, the companies that succeed will be the ones that genuinely treat the people around them (customers and non-customers alike) like human being and not just numbers, dollars, or “stakeholders”. This was particularly evident when the Roughriders’ marketing coordinator Miriam Johnson spoke about their recent influencer campaign during the opening of the new Mosaic Stadium. They did a deep dive to find out what was important to key people in their community to find out what they truly cared about, then customized swag packages for each person along with a handwritten note specific to their lives and personalities. There was no hard-sell or expectation, just a true sense of caring and a desire to do something awesome.

At the end of the day HonCon was a tremendous success. I strongly believe that each and every person in attendance walked away having learned a lot about what other people in this new marketing world are doing to succeed, not only from the fabulous lineup of kick-ass speakers, but from each other as well.

The Only Two Things People Actually Want to Buy

Seth Godin has long been an inspiring figure around our office. His “be remarkable” mantra has been the foundation of a lot of what we do at Strat Lab. For a time our logo even incorporated Seth’s “purple cow” concept. So when I began searching for podcasts to listen to during my drives to and from the office and meetings last week Seth’s name naturally came up. While Seth doesn’t appear to keep up a regular weekly podcast himself, he makes frequent appearances on all manner of podcasts to do with marketing, business, and life. I happened to stumble across Krista Tippett’s amazing show On Being and cued up her interview with Seth, during which he dropped a concept that blew my mind a little bit.

It’s like this. There are two distinct schools of thought when it comes to society and the economy. One is that people by their nature need stuff. Their main motivation is to buy as many “things” as possible. Success is determined by the number of things you have versus the people around you, and businesses should strive to create the shiniest things for the lowest possible price. Seth calls this mindset the “Walmart Economy”. Doesn’t quite sounds right, does it?

The other school of thought says that people don’t actually care about things all that much anymore. Our generation has gotten used to the instant gratification that comes with having “stuff” and its appeal has drastically worn off for us. Gone are the days when people prided themselves for having a slightly better barbecue than their next door neighbour. Instead, people only really care about things that can give them one of two things: Time and personal connections.

These are the two things we find ourselves lacking more and more as we seem to get busier and more plugged into a digital world that feels increasingly isolating. We tend to focus less on the bells and whistles of a product or service and instead prefer things (be it a gadget or an app) that save us much-needed time that we can spend doing things that we actually want to do. If it doesn’t save time, it better create ways to connect with other people in a meaningful way. Products that create communities give people the validation they used to get from having the shiniest new car. As a society that feels increasingly disconnected from one another, the companies that allow us to connect with like-minded people are the ones that will get our business.

This is the future Seth sees. In the world of Amazon where we can quickly and easily get the things we need with the click of a button, the things we want will be entirely things that achieve these two ends. So ask yourself, is my business saving people time or connecting people? If not, it might be time to rethink your widget.

Three More Lessons From “The Virgin Way”

Last week I wrapped Richard Branson’s book The Virgin Way and I must say, I did not expect to enjoy the process of getting back into reading as much as I did. Branson uses some really stellar stories and examples to illustrate powerful concepts that seriously challenge the status quo (arguably Branson’s biggest MO). Here are three more lessons from the second half of The Virgin Way!

Train Them so Well They Can Leave, Treat Them so Well They Don’t Want To

On the subject of leadership in life and business, one of the threads that ties the entire book together is the concept of treating your people like family. Whether you run a business, a non-profit, or simply manage a group or people, Branson insists that treating your people right is the MOST important thing. Your people are a direct reflection of you and happy people tend to give unreal customer service, which in turn leads to happy customers which makes the staff that work with them even happier. It’s a cycle that, if started right, can yield fantastic results. Branson suggests that the best way to support your people is to empower them to solve problems themselves and ensure they have enough structure to know what they should be doing but enough freedom to go over and above.

90% of Life is Just Showing Up

Branson uses several examples of PR bumbles by CEO’s to illustrate that, whether you’re a C-level executive or a mid-level manager, being present when things are happening is half the battle of being a good leader. On one level, being around your people consistently gives you a really good idea of what’s important to them and what challenges they’re really facing (this sounds like common sense but think about how much time you really spend interacting with your boss or employees as a percentage of your day). On another level, being present when there’s a problem allows you to react much more quickly and effectively. Think about how bad it looks when there’s some sort of corporate disaster and the CEO isn’t at the initial press conference. Conversely, the leader who is on the scene immediately (even if they aren’t really doing or saying anything) tends to win the day.

Like Shouldn’t be About Making a Living, But Making Every Living Moment Count

Richard Branson is well known for his eccentric style and sometime death-defying escapades. Branson’s approach to life can be summed up in the tagline of the book: “If it’s not fun it’s not worth doing”. It’s an almost cliche idea at this point, but all throughout the book Branson hammers in the idea that every moment we have on this planet, whether through business or simply the way we conduct ourselves, should be spent embracing the things we love and making life better for other people. Time wasted can never be earned back, so putting in time to simply earn money without achieving these two ends is by all measures a complete waste.

Well there you go! I would highly recommend reading or listening to The Virgin Way (seriously, audio-books have become a game-changer for me).

Three Free Google Tools to Improve Your Website

One of my favourite podcasts from a cool company called EWebResults refers to the internet as “the largest, simplest marketing tool on the planet”. Doesn’t always feel that way, does it? Increasingly I’m finding that once people have a brand-new fancy website their next question is “How do I get it to the top of Google”? WHOAH. Slow down there cowboy. That’s a long and complex process. However, if you’re managing your own SEO the first question you should ask yourself is “What’s most important to Google and why?” Because of Google’s ever-changing algorithm, what’s important to Google one week may not be the next (or, much more likely, the other way around). A sure-fire way to know that something is high on Google’s radar is if Google offers it’s own tools to measure and improve it. Here are some super helpful tools that let you do just that.

Google Page Speed Tool

As of late one of the newest big things Google looks at when ranking sites is user experience. Simply put, are users able to quickly gain an answer to their search query with minimum inconvenience and maximum enjoyment. One thing that can kill even a great website (potentially for rankings but definitely for user experience is a slow load time. Slow sites not only take a long time to load but hog memory and can slow down (or drain battery from) from whole device. Luckily Google offers a handy dandy tool which tests the load speed of any crawlable page on your website giving you a score out of 100 for both desktop and mobile, and ever offering a list of possible solutions for slow load time. Often times improving your page load speed is as easy as checking the page for unnecessarily massive images and reducing them!

Google Structured Data Tool

If you’ve never heard of Shema structured data markup it can seem awfully daunting and a little scary, but I promise it’s not that bad! Effectively structured data used very simple code to show search engines important information about your business (most notably your business name, address, and phone number) and gives it context by defining what the information actually is (a name, an address, a phone number, etc.) This allows engines like Google to quickly identify relevant information on your site, and when Google can quickly find relevant info Google is a happy camper. Tools like Microdata Generator can make the process super easy. Just plug in your information, copy the code, and paste it in the footer of your website. Google offers a tool to test any website (your own or a competitors) and see what kind of information is being marked up.

Google Webmaster

If you’re in a position where just doesn’t make sense to invest in paid SEO measuring software like Moz, have no fear. Google Search Console (formerly known as Google Webmaster) can provide you with a ton of additional data that Google Analytics doesn’t totally cover. Just add the tracking code to your website’s header and this tool will give you a full dashboard information on any broken links (or “404 errors”) to your site, what exact searches your Google search traffic is coming from, and the top domains that are currently linking to your site.

Well there you do, my top three favourite free Google tools (at least so far!) Obviously not listed is the all-powerful Google analytics, but that’s another blog for another time…If you have any questions about the tools above, give us a call! We’d love to chat.

 

Four Lessons From “The Virgin Way”

Recently I’ve been making a concerted effort to get more reading done. My mother is a teacher librarian so when I was a kid reading was priority numero uno, but as often happens when one goes through university “reading for pleasure” is squeezed out of the equation by “required reading”. That said, (oops, ignore that) I’m realizing more and more how little I’ve actually learned about life and business from such riveting reads as “Managing Information Systems, 1st Edition”. As a pro tip if you find you have a hard time sitting down and actually turning pages I would highly recommend downloading an audiobook app like Audible, it goes a long way. Last night I mowed through Richard Branson’s “The Virgin Way” and managed to get about half way through. I gotta say, the guy knows his stuff. As I often do, I found myself texting myself some of the best quotes and biggest ideas from the first half of the book and they eventually stacked up to the point where I had to write a blog post just to get them out. So here goes.

 

 

1.”Nobody has ever learned anything from hearing themselves speak.”

The entire first section of The Virgin Way deals with the importance of listening. The best business leaders it turns out are not necessarily great orators, but rather are extremely good at actively listening to everyone who talks to them and, most importantly, acting on feedback. Richard stresses that it’s much better to listen and say nothing than to talk and say nothing (which many people are prone to do). His advice is simple and, true to form, he summarizes it perfectly in this quote. Shouldn’t you be looking to learn as much as possible in your interactions with clients or colleagues? Are you really going to learn anything from speaking yourself?

2. “The only valuable thing on your business card is your name and your contact info.”

On the subject of “rank”, the “Virgin Way” (as Virgin staff affectionately refer to their way of doing business) deals with hierarchy in a very flat way. As far as Richard is concerned your title at the company is subservient to your ideas and your work ethic. Your name (and by association, your reputation) is a much better indication of your value. Furthermore, being able to get a hold of you directly and easily is much more valuable than the letters behind your name.

 

3. “Delegation is better than relegation.”

When it comes to leadership in management, Richard stresses the importance of handing things off to trusted people, and then trusting them entirely. The Virgin Group is made up of over 30 companies, each with their own team of C-level executives and Richard rarely gives them input on how to run their respective companies. The Virgin Way makes the firm distinction and relegation. Delegating passes the full blame or praise for decisions along with the unfettered ability to make those decisions and respond to the outcomes. Relegating in contrast passes the blame but takes away full control of the decisions, or puts the other party in a box (think: “I’m passing this along to you, pick the best bad option).

 

4. “Sometimes not knowing the correct way to do things and doing them anyways opens up the most amazing doorways.”

One of Richard’s most well-known “catch phrases” and consequently the title of his first book, is “Screw it, let’s do it!”. Think about the diversity of the Virgin Group of companies. You’ve got everything from records production, to air travel, to cell phones, to the ill-fated Virgin Cola (yes, that was a real thing). A product offering this diverse comes from jumping in with both feet, having only a “pretty good” idea of what’s below. Often times, approaching a situation you’ve never dealt with puts you at an advantage, because you’re not pre-trained to achieve predictable (and often mediocre) results. Take risks, try things, fail and learn, says Sir Richard.

I’m very much looking forward to finishing The Virgin Way tonight. Branson writes in a very personal tone, and you can almost hear the smile behind every word. It doesn’t hurt that the guy reading his audio-book has a voice like butter. Part 2 will be coming soon!

“Sell Me This Pen” The Right Way

Last week Brandon and I had the pleasure of helping out at Campbell Collegiate with some mock job interviews. We were pared with students from grades ten and eleven and grilled them on their skills, interests, and experience as we attempted to find a student we would “hire” to work at Strategy Lab. Being the weirdo that I am, I asked almost exclusively out-of-the box questions like “Who do you think would win in a fight between a silverback gorilla and a grizzly bear?” and “How would you describe the colour red to someone who’s never seen colour?”. One test I used for every candidate was the old-school Jordan Balfort challenge: “Sell me this pen”.

Traditionally this is used to develop persuasive, cold-call sales techniques which is more than a little sleazy, but there was method to my madness. At the beginning of the day we were given free Conexus-branded pens (thanks guys!) and as I handed one to each interviewee to sell me I was hoping against hope that someone would think big enough to use the Conexus brand in their sales pitch.

As far as TED Talks go Simon Sinek’s “Start With Why” has been used to death in marketing circles to the point where it’s almost become a tired cliche. I stress “almost” because I think it’s truly timeless and I get something new from it every time I watch it. My interviews with these kids were the most beautifully perfect embodiment of the “Why-How-What” concept.

What?

The majority of the students immediately tried to sell me on the different features of the pen like the stylus, the grip, the ease of use, etc. The bells and whistles that made it a good pen among pens, but didn’t really make me want to buy it. I mean, if I already have a pen why would I shell out money for this specific one? They were trying to sell on the “what”.

How?

A handful of the interviewees told me all the things I could do with the pen. Doodle, write notes, draw pictures, you name it. They positioned the pen as a means to an end and something that would solve a problem I had. This went one step beyond just showing off the features because they were identifying something I needed to do and trying to sell me the solution, or the “how”. But I wasn’t satisfied.

Why?

One student out of eight took the bait. It’s my second last interview of the day. I hand her the pen and she thinks for a while, then turns to me and asks “Can I use the Conexus logo in my pitch?” Up until now no one had even seemed to notice the logo, so I start to nod excitedly. “Well I would probably ask you first if you were a Conexus member, then I’d tell you that by buying this pen you’d be supporting us so we can help more people”. I’m freaking out at this point. Finally, someone sold me the “why”.

Here’s the moral of the story. Modern marketing requires us to not only show off the features or solve people’s problems, but to actually connect with them and make them feel something. There’s a reason paid programming “As Seen on TV” ads seem almost laughable these days. There’s a reason the practice of trying to convince people buy something they aren’t in the market for seems inherently sleazy. Creating a belief or a community or a world-changing vision creates intrinsic motivation in your customer base to not only buy from you, but to love you. Once you have that, you’ll never need to market again.

 

 

Saskatchewan in Keywords – May 2017

May 2017 will go down in history as the month of the fidget spinner.

For any of who don’t know, Google Trends is a wicked cool tool that allows you to view real time Google search query data by location visualized. You can view the top search keywords in a given industry or generally across the the country or province over the past day, week, quarter, month, or year. Typically the top Google searches from month to month are more or less what you’d expect (some iteration of “Google”, “Facebook”, “YouTube”, “weather”, “news”, etc.), but what I find more interesting is the fastest rising keywords in a given month, or those which have experienced the highest increase in search volume. You can view these above by clicking the bottom right-hand arrow and selecting “Rising”. Here are the search terms which will now and forever define May 2017 in Saskatchewan.

 

Cinco De Mama

Topping the list by a wide margin are searches related to the tragic suicide of Soundgarden and Audioslave frontman Chris Cornell last week. Everyone’s favourite excuse to drink tequila at 11 in the morning Cinco De Mayo also topped this month’s search queries. Predictably, searches spiked dramatically for Mother’s Day as absent-minded sons and daughters (myself included) scrambled to remember what day it actually was, only to forget and look it up again a few days later. You’ll also notice a fairly significant increase in searches related to the latest craze in boredom-suppression: fidget spinners.

 

Despacito Means “Slowly” in Spanish

In addition to raw web search results, Google Trends also let’s you view to the fastest rising search terms on YouTube specifically. This month Miley Cyrus’s latest hit Malibu drew a great deal of attention and, correspondingly, a considerable amount of search traffic. A tearful performance at this week’s Billboard Music Awards didn’t hurt either. Topping the charts for increased search results on YouTube this month was…Wait a second…Fidget spinners again? What the heck is going on?

Okay, let’s try one more thing. Finally, Google Trends allows you to narrow keyword searches to those used in Google Images. There has to be something interesting there, right?

 

ARE YOU KIDDING ME FIDGET SPINNERS AGAIN. The only discernibly higher search phrase for images in Saskatchewan with an increase of 150% was fidget spinners. Wow.

May 2017 ladies and gents, the official month of fidget spinners in Saskatchewan.

 

PS: For reference, here’s what the trend line for fidget spinners looks like over the past year. Wild, right?

Let’s Take a Second to Remember The Basics

So you’re a business looking to dive into social media. What does that even mean? Back in the day when social was just beginning to become the massive snowball it is today, getting involved as a business was messy. It was imperfect. You had to watch and listen to how people were using various platforms. You had to try things and make mistakes. You had to learn in real time as things were changing and growing and evolving.

Nowadays it seems like you can just decide “I want to be on social media”.

And you probably should be. Creating a community and actively engaging with that community has become the new marketing model. Storytelling and relationship building are more important than ever, overtaking “brand-building” or “reach and frequency” as key outcomes for your marketing budget. That being said, businesses seem to be pivoting to social as a silver bullet for their online marketing while fundamentally forgetting basic marketing concepts. Before you even think about creating a page or an account be it SnapChat, Facebook, LinkIn, or the like, check yourself against these basics when it comes to social media

 

  1. Not all platforms are created equal.

    Gone are the days when you could just set up a Facebook and Twitter page, link them to auto-post and call it a day. There is a buffet of options to choose from when it comes to social platforms. It can be overwhelming, which makes it so surprising that most company’s first instinct is to jump into everything at once. Specific, methodic targeting is becoming a lost art. Less is more. Get really good at one thing, not mediocre at five. Take stock of your core function as an organization, the type of content you’ll be posting, and your audience and be selective with the platforms you choose. Which brings us to rule number two…

    never-half-ass-two-things-whole-ass-one-thing

  2. Focus on where your people are (and where they want to see you).

    “We need to be on Snapchat”. Why? Is that really where your target audience is? Is that going to be the best use of your time? Is that where you’re going to make the highest number of meaningful connections? More importantly, is that where your people even want to connect with you? You may have the best concrete company in the world, but I don’t necessarily want to look at concrete on Instagram. Founder of the Social Fresh Conference Jason Keath speaks regularly about the importance of focus when it comes to social media and his message is simple: if you really want to convert you don’t need to be (and probably shouldn’t be) everywhere. Respect your audience, view your business through their eyes, and act accordingly.

  3. Have a freaking purpose.

    This is possibly the most bizarrely broken rule in the book. Organizations and companies seem to think that the equation goes “IF I’m active on social media AND I get lots of likes THEN my business will do better”. What the heck does that mean?! There are so many other steps involved in that equation. I recently caught an episode of the Jelly Marketing Podcast (would highly recommend) featuring writer and speaker Tod Maffin where he hammers the idea of true purpose home and slays the concept of vanity metrics. What are you specifically trying to achieve with the tools you’re using? Are you trying to keep your membership up to date with new information? Are you trying to show how easy your product is to use? Are you trying to showcase the genuine personalities of your team? Have a purpose beyond getting likes and followers. Those will come and arguably don’t matter as long at your working towards a clear goal.

  4. Create value.

    Advertising and selling without value creation does not work. Period. Full stop. I don’t care about your car dealership. I don’t care that you can broker my mortgage. I DO NOT CARE. Do something that makes my life better, even a little. Tell me something interesting I didn’t know before. Better yet, show me it in a cool way. Make me smile, make me laugh, make me think, solve my problem. Do something that goes beyond the basic transaction. It’s not just a nice touch anymore, it’s expected.

Well there you go. None of this is particularly ground-breaking. They’re things we as internet marketers have been shouting about for years, but as the social media space becomes more and more crowded and confusing it’s important to remember the basics. They’ll save you time, money, and a whole lot of headaches.

An Open Letter to Social Media

Dear Social Media,

We’ve been together for a long time. We’ve seen some major highs and some rock-bottom lows. For better or worse, I always knew I could turn to you. Always knew that at the end of the day I had a screen and a community of people I sort of knew who could validate however I was feeling, and if they didn’t screw ‘em, I’d find new ones that did.

I was really your first love. Previous generations never had you and never dreamed they would. Throughout the time that we’ve been together you’ve grown and changed so much. On one hand it’s fascinating to see your relationship with each new generation change. On another, it’s exhausting trying to figure out how to approach you on any given day. Secretly I worry that I don’t really understand you as well as someone much younger does. Are you outgrowing me?

Lately things have been different. I’ve started seeing someone else: the world around me. There’s so much beauty to be seen, so much fun to be had, and so many memories to savour without your constant interruption. As much as I love having instant access to anyone, anytime, anywhere, as much as I like the likes, things are better in 360 full-colour.

You were always best when you made the tangible world brighter and more exciting. You still amaze me with your ability to connect people and tell stories, but lately you’ve been dividing people and shifting their focus inwards.

I think we need to take a break. We’ll still see each other around, but right now we both need to figure out how to actually be social again.

 

Sincerely,

Us

You Have Time, You Just Don’t Know It // eps 53 #inthelab

I was going to start this blog with a quote about how precious time is, but after a quick Google search for “time quotes” that seemed kind of unnecessary. Just about every majorly quotable person has said something about time and how we use it (or don’t use it) and it seems pretty clear that we’re all on the same page: Time is the most valuable, fleeting commodity we have and, much like Bill Murray movies, there never seems to be quite enough of it. We all marvel at that select group of high-functioning individuals who seem to be able to achieve so much with the exact same 24 hours afforded to us every day. Perhaps my favourite response to “I don’t have time” comes from Gary Vaynerchuck. There’s some language that’s a little NSFW, but the sentiment is real: Everyone has time, stop watching f***ing Lost.

Now, does this mean you should live your life like a non-stop automaton, never allowing yourself a second for personal growth or relaxation? No. But it does highlight the importance of taking real stock of how much of your time is spent inefficiently, probably without you even knowing it. Now I’ve never been a big fan of the “self help” mentality, but over the past few weeks I have challenged myself to follow three things to make better use of my time and so far I gotta tell you, they’re helping a lot.

digital marketing regina 2

1. Stop Procrastinating

As an avid, life-long procrastinator I know full well that this is easier said than done, but completing tasks immediately as opposed to letting them pile up can take a mountain of stress off your shoulders and save you time in the long run. Things always seem to take longer when you leave them until the last possible minutes. Start with small things. Wash a dish right after you use it. Make a phone call you need to make when you think of it, not a few hours later. You’d be amazed at how these small behavioral patterns will eventually form broader habits that will save you time.

2. Identify your “Peak Times”

I have never been, and will likely never be, a morning person. Between the hours of 9 and 10:30 am I might get a half hour of real work done on a good day. My most productive hours fall between about 7 and 9:30 pm after I’ve worked out and had a few hours to wipe my brain clean from the rest of the day. This is when I get the most work done, so this is when I work the most. It seems logical, but I’m sure you’ve felt it. The restless dread that comes from knowing you have the motivation to do something but convincing yourself that outside of your nine to five isn’t “work time”. Figure out at what point during the day you’re likely to achieve the most and DO IT. You’ll find yourself getting three hours of work done in one simply because of your mental state.

3. Make a Checklist

Putting pen to paper (or fingers to keys) and actually writing out exactly what you need to get done in a given week is just what the disorganized monkey in your brain (don’t kid yourself, we all have one) needs to find a track and stay on it. The more detailed and step-by-step the list, the quicker you will accomplish the task at hand. Imagine you’re putting together Ikea furniture if that helps. With a few vague illustrations and a general idea of what the thing is suppose to look like, you’ll probably be able to put something resembling a dresser in a few days. Throw in some actual detailed instructions and you’ll have that puppy done in an hour.

Write yourself better Ikea instructions.

Well there you have it, my three ways of skinning the cat that is the average work week. I can’t imagine a point in the foreseeable future when any one of us will get more that our allotted 86,400 seconds in a day, but what we do get is to choose how we manage those seconds in order to get the most out of our day and ultimately, our lives. Time is precious and, much like change in the couch cushions, we typically have more of it than we think. It’s just a matter of believing that and knowing where to look when the pizza guy arrives.

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